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to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must maintain the strongest military in the world. >> i believe, and always have, that america must engage, not retreat, in the world, but engage in the world. my record is consistent on these points. >> woodruff: but as a nebraska senator, in 2007, hagel angered fellow republicans when he opposed the surge of u.s. troops into iraq. today, his former close friend, arizona senator john mccain made clear, they haven't forgotten. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous. >> are you going to answer the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like an answer on whether you were right or wrong, then you're free to
. researchers blamed a rise in temperature for what they call an unprecedented retreat. now come to israel, where talks are already underway about building a new coalition government. put they's ballot alliance led by benjamin netanyahu -- and left him in a substantially weaker position. there is a young, centrist party. we have this report from jerusalem. >> thrusting himself and his centrist party onto center stage. after a long night, about his probable role in the coalition government, a potential newcomer, he told the bbc before the election exactly what he stands for. >> somebody has to be the voice of the middle class. there is a dispute with the palestinians. we came into the political arena to become that voice. >> benjamin netanyahu is expected to bring him into a new, broad government. the government was weakened by yesterday's vote, but net non remains prime minister. he is being urged to put together as broad coalition as possible, reflecting the day-to- day concerns of the secular is really is. perhaps, some of the ultra- orthodox religious parties and recent governments. aft
with the financial times, thanks so much for talking to us. >> ifill: next, to israel. president obama called prime minister benjamin netanyahu today to congratulate him on his victory in last week's parliamentary elections. the two leaders spoke about ensuring security in the region at a time of growing tensions. with their elections behind them, both men plan to address the civil war in syria, the threat posed by iran's nuclear program, and the stalemate between israelis and palestinians. and those are the subjects of three stories this week from margaret warner who is on a reporting trip to israel, the west bank and gaza. she begins tonight reporting on israeli concerns about the conflict in nearby syria. >> warner: the sweeping vistas of the golan heights plateau and the bucolic life of the israelis who live here bear quiet witness to the strategic importance of this area which israel captured from syria during the 1967 arab-israeli war. but after four decades of quiet along this border, israel, just like syria's arab neighbors, is increasingly worried about the unpredictable spillover from the
and experience to tackle israel's many problems. rejecting criticism from home and overseas, he is taking israel down a dangerous confrontational path. mr. netanyahu has authorized even more building in the settlements. there has been no progress in the peace talks with palestinians. the prime minister could isolate israel even further. >> if they often form a government with the extreme right wing and the ultra religious, this is a government that will call -- with the european union, a clash with the obama administration and will not curry favor with the israeli public. this kind of government might not survive. >> this party led by a formal journalist could now play a role in a more modern government. another newcomer is shaking israel's political landscape. >> benjamin netanyahu has taken this page -- taken the stage. let's listen. >> that was the whole of israeli citizens. i'm hoping to leave these changes and for this purpose, we ought to create a wide as possible government. i started this task already this evening. the government that will be created will be based on the following princi
and we will prevent any attacks for hezbollah to smuggle such weapons from syria. is israel attacks, it means that such an attempt by hezbollah was made. >> the contagion from the violence in syria worries the whole region. syria sits on the middle east religious and political fault lines. they connect the war to all of its neighbors, whether they like it or not. the war in syria is exporting trouble. its neighbors are seeing a new threats to their security as a result of the slow collapse of the syrian state. this time, israel felt threatened but all of the country sharing borders and some further afield have seen rising tensions and in some places, bloodshed because of the war. international diplomacy is deadlocked. >> that there has been problems in the turkish border in recent weeks. there are huge flows of refugees over the jordanian border. many tensions in iraq at the moment. lebanon, many connections to syria. the longer this crisis goes on, the more people that it affects, the greater the danger. >> in syria, the victims of the latest massacre at aleppo have been buried. sy
will also be confirmed, although that's a bigger fight, and his remarks about israel that somehow he isn't tough enough on israel, his objection to sanctions was that they were unilateral. he now supports the current sanctions. he is certainly not antiisrael. those arguments will be put aside. he is there to cut the budget, and he's the man for the moment. he has the appetite to do that. >> so this prospective appointment is bypassing wall street. is that good play by obama? >> well, in the first four years of the -- of his administration, the first term, his great job was to keep the financial sector from collapsing. so he had someone intimately familiar in tim geithner with wall street. in the second four years his great job is balancing fiscal issues, and he has in jack lew somebody who, as eleanor said, knows the budget up and down, tremendous respect, a great negotiator. keep in mind, jack lew is something that people don't understand. he is a liberal fiscal hawk. he's a liberal deficit hawk. he's got very strong views on the safety net and funding of government but he really does b
a situation in israel which hundreds of thousands of israelis do not have a personal status in the country. >> rose: change in syria, israel and jordan when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >>> a polar bear cub is born with no sense of sight. we are a decisional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city this is dharl charlie rose. >> the arab spring reached syria nearly two years ago when residents of a small southern city protested the government's tover ture of students. today those protests erupted into one of the post deadly civil yars in syrian history. over 400,000 refugees have fled the war-torn country, opposition remains fragmented and in some cases disorganized but as the violence escalates, the international community may have to decide when and how to intervene am joining me cbs news correspondent clarissa ward. she has spent much of the past year reporting from inside sirria. she is one of the only journalists to tell this stor
hopes for reconciling differences over how to deal with israel. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the war in syria reached another grim milestone this week. the united nations estimated that the death toll from the almost two-year long conflict has reached more than 60,000. ray suarez has our report. >> suarez: a pro-government tv station in damascus played a patriotic dirge today over video from an early-morning car bombing in a mainly sunni neighborhood. the blast killed at least 11 people, and wounded many more, as they stood in line at a gas station. a similar explosion on wednesday killed 30. the government blamed "terrorists," its term for the rebels. the opposition claimed the assad regime planted the bomb in a disputed neighborhood. elsewhere in the capital, syrian air force fighter-bombers streaked overhead. as day broke, one dropped its payload on the northeastern suburb of douma. it was all evidence of the escalating fight for damascus. the rebels now hold suburbs on the southern and eastern outskirts of the city. and to the nort
with the enemies of israel. >> he is trying to reestablish his right-wing credentials by supporting more building in jewish settlements of occupied palestinian land, which is seen illegal by international law. but even that is not enough to appease some of his former supporters on the right. -- >> one report said that there was a record surge in settlement expansion, not enough for those on the right to say that he is not tough enough for the palestinians. >> israel has to be strong on their negotiations and by being weak -- this is detrimental. >> others worry that his decision to form an alliance with the older-nationalist lieberman could hurt israel overseas. >> israel is going to be under the brunt of increased international criticism and what is most dangerous is the criticism from europe and the united states, not from the people who don't particularly like us. >> benjamin netanyahu and barack obama have never been close, and the u.s. president is resigned to a difficult relationship with a more right-wing government in israel. -- >> an election watched very closely, even here on inaugurati
, the elections in israel; evidence of concussions in retired football players; "roe v. wade" and a landmark ruling 40 years on. >> brown: now, to israel, as election results come in tonight, prime minister benjamin netanyahu appears to be on his way to another term in office. but as margaret warner reports, his next government could look quite different from his last. >> warner: the prime minister's victory came as no surprise as the leader had a significant lead the polls heading into the election. whatever governing coalition he tries to put together it's sure to include new faces and new agendas that will influence the country. one of those naftali bennett, a high-tech millionaire and former leader who remodeled and old religious and nationalist party for the 21st century, calling it the jewish home. he was out early at a polling station in tel aviv. >> i think we're starting something new in israel. hey! we're trying to unite all the various tribes in israel, the secular, the religious, the ultrareligious, the jews, the arabs, everyone together to unite israel and do something good for
. >> thank you. >> ifill: now to the middle east and new tensions along the border between israel and syria. the "newshour" has confirmed reports that israeli war planes struck a convoy inside syria today. syrian officials have confirmed some details of those reports and disputed others. israel would not confirm or deny the strike. margaret warner has been reporting on the developments from jerusalem. i spoke with her a short while ago. margaret, it's good to see you. based on your reporting, what can you tell us about this attack today? >> well, gwen, israeli officials are completely mum about this, but i've been able to confirm from a u.s. official that, in fact, the attack took place, that hit was a convoy of trucks carrying s.a.-17 antimissile components or the missiles themselves headed toward leban lebanon. the official i talked to said it actually occurred fairly near damascus but that the missiles or missile parts were already in hezbollah's hands. in other words, that this was not a syrian army convoy taking the weapons to hezbollah, the militant shiite group in lebanon, but hezbol
. there has been no official confirmation from israel. i spoke to the chief international correspondent a few moments ago. what can you tell us about what was hit? >> we had two different accounts. we had reports that israeli jets for the first time had bombed a convoy of weapons heading from syria towards lebanon to support hezbollah. hezbollah has been expressing its concern in recent days and it sent its military intelligence chief to washington where he will express concern about chemical weapons from syria of going into the hands of hezbollah. on the nighttime news, they were taking satisfaction in the fact there had not been any verbal response from damascus or hezbollah. no physical response as well. syria came out with their own version of offense which was there was no convoy but they had bombed a scientific research center close to damascus and it used a rather interesting phrase, that it was used to support the resistance. that was the only thing they could agree on. it was something for hezbollah. what it was though, we are not sure. >> can you make any speculation about what kind
to, or is it about what he has said or what they believe he may believe about israel and iran? >> my sense is that it's mostly about israel and iran and that they believe that as secretary of defense who says the kinds of things he says, not so much -- not exclusively the policy positions. but one of the reasons people have liked chuck hagel over the years, a lot of reasons reporters like him and his supporters like him is he's a pretty free-speaking guy. he's iconoclastic. he's willing to say things and think about things that is outside not just party orthodoxy but outside what the mainstream foreign policy establishment thinks and that for a lot of republicans to do that on israel, to do that on iran, for someone who's going to be running the pentagon i think they find that alarming. and there's other things. they resent him because he said nice things about the president. they resent him because he endorsed bob kerrey for senate. >> rose: and was against the iraq war. >> there's all those issues. >> rose: did the president have any choice after he floated the name because of what
people dead. >> woodruff: from israel margaret warner reports on fears of islamic militants and chemical weapons just over the border. >> warner: with conflict raging inside syria, israel's taking no chances. it's now fortifying the security barrier behind me to guard against any dangers that may arise. >> ifill: and from mali, lindsay hilsum has a story of celebration as french and local forces push north to capture two key towns.
in a commercial mercantile way with these regimes, and we have a foreign policy that deals of of israel. meet yahir lapide. >> a new arrival on the scene is and personality lapide who leads israel. why has netanyahu lost steam? >> this is a very interesting revolution. there's no doubt but this election, in fact with the defeat for netanyahu. >> meaning what? he won the election. >> he may be the next prime minister. his party went down. >> who, yahir? >> no, netanyahu's own party went down from 42 seats to 31 seats. so his party had fewer seats. this guy came out of nowhere. his first time running for office. he got 19 seats. he became the most -- the second most important party in -- out of nowhere. so he has become the star of this thing. and netanyahu is going to have to make a deal with him. all of the politicians are splintered but it's never been like this. now netanyahu is going to have to move, if i may say so, this is now a center right. it is going to be much more pragmatic and open. >> how long is his term? >> five years, isn't it? >> it can be as much as five years but it almost
's relation with israel and jordan's relation with israel and turkey's relation with israel and you see populism and the willing tons pray play that is problematic for israel's perspective. >> rose: risk six is europe muddling through. >> muddling through and a much lower risk in europe than last year. >> rose: gdp growth less than one, two percent. >> yes but not falling apart. >> rose: okay. and euro stone remains euro zone remains stable? >> absolutely .. >> rose: east asia politics, what is that. >> east asia politics. >> rose: is that indonesia? >> basically it is the entire -- you think about the pivot, one of the most important policies we put in place the last few years is largely because across the asian continent, you have countries that are increasingly integrating economically towards a very strong china, but they maintain much stronger political and security relations with the united states. >> rose: which countries are we talkable about? >> we are talking a. >> talking about japan but also talking about vietnam, korea, thailand, even myanmar. >> rose: even burma. >> even b
israel and her boss, there has been allegiances revealed between the factions. the western nations are wary of the group. many countries regard that as a terrorist organization. earlier this week, the israeli government says it could take control of the west bay. the rally was earlier than planned and speakers stopped after organizers said there were organizational problems. there were reports between members that felt the leaders were not given a prominent enough role at the event. >> a roundup of other stories. the united states started deploying troops and missiles to turkey. the question that the defense system and in october, five citizen's guide when a mortar landed on their home. gabrielle gifford has visited the town where a gunman killed 26 people inside of an elementary school. deferreds was shot and critically wounded in a 2011 shooting and was planning to meet on friday with families. now for the bumpy ride the american economy has taken. we started the week with high drama and related -- ended with the latest unemployment report. theasn't enough to change 7.8% jobless
for israel. there's no question about that. gwen: already has. >> and he's calling senate ofss saying he's a strong supporter of israel but on the point of, if he's going to not get confirmed, i would find that shocking because the president will line up behind the -- democrats will line up behind the president's choice. >> two purple hearts. gwen: john brennan has to be confirmed and he's been the architect, for many democrats, a far more troubling policy of targeting killings and drones. >> the drone policy, right. i would imagine that his confirmation hearing, as they should be, a full discussion about what the president's policies are going forward and are.his true beliefs in this case, all three of these gentlemen, kerry, hailing and brennan, will say, the president's policies are, i will be executing the president's policies. >> the most controversial thing for him for the democrats is are his fingertips in the c.i.a. bush years, obama seems to think that's not a problem and has indicated he doesn't think that's a problem for him. the drone program, it's popular. it's popular with
addressed claims that he's anti- israel, among other things. california democrat barbara boxer also issued a statement of support. the backing of two prominent jewish senators is expected to help hagel ease concerns among other, pro-israel lawmakers. a major debt rating agency warned today the u.s. could lose its top credit status if there's a delay in raising the debt ceiling. the federal government is expected to exceed its borrowing limit by march, unless congress acts. if fitch does downgrade u.s. debt, it would join standard and poor's, which took that action in 2011 during the last debt ceiling debate. the u.s. house moved to pass a hurricane sandy relief bill this evening. $17 billion would go for immediate recovery in the affected northeastern states. another $33 billion is for long- term spending. some republicans argued that much of the money isn't for emergency relief at all. california's tom mcclintock called for stripping that funding out. >> according to the congressional budget office, more than 90% of this money won't even be spent this year. that's not emergency relief. $1
.i.a. will now be called to answer questions about everything from israel to iran to interrogations. there has been much speculation about both nominations, but the president made them official this afternoon in the east room of the white house. >> my choice for two key members of my national security team. chuck hagel, former secretary of defense and john brennan for director of the central intelligence agency. >> woodruff: hagel is a vietnam veteran who would replace the retiring leon panetta. he would be the first defense secretary who saw combat as an enlisted soldier. >> in chuck hagel our troops see a decorated combat veteran of character and strength. they see one of their own. chuck is the champion of our troops and our veterans and our military families. as the leader of the v.a., he fought to give our veterans the benefits they deserve. as head of the u.s.o., he devoted himself to caring for our troops. >> woodruff: the former senator from nebraska who left office in 2009 said he especially wants to serve those in uniform. >> these are people who give so much to this nation every day
. >> brown: we turn to israel, where prime minister benjamin netanyahu is working to build his coalition after tuesday's election. the contest saw a surprisingly strong showing from a centrist party led by a former television personality. margaret warner is in jerusalem. i spoke with her a short time ago. >> so margaret, a few days after the election what kind of government seems to be taking shape? >> jeff, i'm told that bebenetanyahu is trying to put together a very broad coalition, not relying just on the trawl religious and ultra conservative and settler movement crowd that is in his current government. so he is working with that surprise second place finisher to try to put together a very big coalition as well. a lot more votes than they really need. would if the people they're talking about join the government really span a range of viewpoints on everything from how to improve economic conditions for the middle class to say restarting peace talks with the principles. but it will take-- it could take a month to actually firm up. >> tell us a little bit about that surprise second pla
, which we ought to have, on where republican wants to go on and a second term, on iran, israel, and defense spending and a particular. >> next, the looming fight over gun control, as the vice president meets with the nra in the white house. >> there is no similar solution to how we deal with the kinds of things that happened up in newtown or colorado or the general gun violence that exists in america today and. the president and i and the cabinet understands that it is a complicated issue. >> vice-president biden met with the nra, among others, at the white house this week. he's expected to deliver gun control or commissions to the president as early as next tuesday. colby, will this be a showdown with the nra over an assault weapons ban? >> no, it will not be gunfight at the o.k. corral. they will oppose any effort to do any thing on guns, and they may prevail. and there will probably be some agreement on background checks. to be parochial about this, in the district of columbia it would mean nothing to us regardless of any proposal did last year, the metropolitan police depar
: margaret warner reports from jerusalem on moves in israel to form a new coalition government. >> sreenivasan: and ray suarez updates the high-powered meetings of heads of state, business leaders, and others at the world economic forum in davos, switzerland. >> brown: from mali, lindsey hilsum looks at tensions caused by government troops as they advance into islamist territory. >> sreenivasan: spencer michels has a story about trash and one city's crusade to eliminate all of it. >> reporter: san francisco boasts that it recycles 80% of all garbage, and is aiming for zero waste. but some skeptics don't believe it. >> brown: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
community from ethiopia yah to israel. it was an achievement not of myself only, it was a collective achievement of the state of israel but i had a part in it and i am proud of it. >> my dad had been the guy that dropped out of high school, joined the army, was fighting pancho via and i went to night school at night, went to law school at night, the whole bit. he wanted me to be a lawyer. so i said well, we owe $2,000, when i get out i'll owe $2,000, so i said let me get a job. so i got a job, my coach at brown was a coach at brown, took the job at penn state, so i went down there with him, i was going to go two years. i got caught up in coaching. i called up and i said dad, i'm gonna coach. you're gonna coach? what did you go to college for? >> rose: (laughs) >> and i said well i think i can do a good job. he said well you make sure you have an impact. he said don't waste your time. >> rose: how long were you ace sis tonight to rick? >> 16 years. >> rose: 16 years? >> yup. i had started to work at penn state before i even graduated brown. in those days we used to have two weeks of r
. west african nations have begun sending troops as wlt. this was election eve in israel, and prime minister benjamin netanyahu appeared likely to keep power-- but not by much. today he urged voters to "come home" to his conservative coalition. polls suggested he could lose seats to an even more conservative challenger. millionaire naftali bennett and his far-right jewish home party have gained momentum. he opposes new peace initiatives with the palestinians. the u.s. house will vote wednesday on raising the national debt ceiling. republican leaders announced today the extension lets the government continue borrowing money until may 19. the current debt ceiling-- $16.4 trillion-- could be reached as early as mid-february. the house bill does not specify a new dollar amount. it does mandate that congress approve budgets, or lawmakers won't be paid. major league baseball lost two hall of famers over the weekend. st. louis cardinals great stan musial-- "stan the man"-- died saturday at his home just outside the city. he played 22 years, helping the cards win three world series titles i
government has kept the peace agreements, the camp david accords with israel and has a working relationship with the united states. i'm worried about a lot of these trends in the middle east-- we haven't even talked about the civil war? syria-- but i do think the administration is focused on this. the president has a working relationship with president mohammed morsi. israel has to meet a lot of these tests. they'll need american support. and i think we are seeing an engaged, sophisticate administration at work. >> brown: all this, of course, danielle pletka, goes to the sort of continuing fallout from the arab spring. all of these countries that nick burns just talked about and the management of that. >> and that's reality challenge. i mean, these are the questions. you know all of these sort of bureaucratic ideals -- hes had a relationship, we're maintaining this, we had a panel, we're following recommendations -- this is really about the national security of the united states and support for our allies in the region. and they're looking to us and what they are seeing is not, gee, we have
. >> tom: hagel's not a shoe-in for the position. he's received criticism for his record on israel, iran, and gay rights. current defense secretary leon panetta says he will retire when his replacement is approved by the senate. >> tom: tonight we begin a new weekly series here on nbr. we partnered with some of the nation's top universities to bring you the best research on business, the economy and investing. we call it nbru. now our partners in this combine over 400 years of business knowledge. they include harvard university, standford, wharton and vanderbilt universities. each monday we will speak with top professors about key money issues and you can read in-depth at nbr.com, just look for the tab. now we begin our series with the corporate focus on shareholder value. every c.e.o. of a publicly-traded company concentrates on-- most prominently on display every day. that focus on share price hurts the economy, according to margaret blair, a professor at vanderbilt university. professor, is shareholder value first best expressed by today's stock price? >> yes, tom, thanks for having m
obama, the c.i.a. has stepped up drone attacks, especially in pakistan. britain and israel also use the unmanned aircraft. the u.n. report is due in october. in economic news, first-time claims for unemployment benefits hit a five-year low last week. if that trend continues, it could signal a better job market. and on wall street, the dow jones industrial average gained 46 points to close at 13,825. but the nasdaq fell 23 points to close at 3,130. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: president obama's nominee for secretary of state - - senator john kerry -- took the first step toward senate confirmation today. newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman reports. >> reporter: for john kerry, it was a day long in coming. the diplomat's son, veteran senator, and former democratic presidential nominee has been considered a potential secretary of state for years. >> you've almost lived your entire life for this moment. >> reporter: indeed, kerry first appeared before the senate foreign relations committee in 1971, as a vietnam veteran challenging
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)